Archive for May, 2013

“On the Aisle with Larry” 25 May 2013

Lawrence Harbison, The Playfixer, brings you up to date with what’s hot and what’s not in New York. In this column, Larry reports on HERE LIES LOVE; MURDER BALLAD; NATASHA, PIERRE AND THE GREAT COMET OF 1812,
BUNTY BERMAN PRESENTS, THESE HALCYON DAYS and THE CAUCASIAN CHALK CIRCLE.

Here Lies Love, Murder Ballad and Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812, all of which opened Off Broadway this month, have something else in common: they are all “audience immersive” musicals; that is, there is little separation between the performers and the audience. You’re right there in the midst of them, as songs and dancing swirl all around you.

Here Lies Love, at the Public Theater, is about the rise and fall of Imelda Marcos, wife of the late Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos. Director Alex Timbers has ripped out the seats in the Public’s LuEsther Mertz Theatre, which leaves a large room in which patrons stand, amongst platforms which are moved about by stagehands. It’s a brilliant concept, but only if you don’t mind standing for the 80 minutes the show runs. It also helps if you like to boogie. The score, by David Byrne and Fatboy Slim, is one terrific song after another, performed by an energetic cast led by Ruthie Ann Miles as Imelda. This has become quite a hot ticket, but the Public has just extended it another month, so you may be able to get in.

The interior of the Union Square Theatre has also been ripped out to accommodate Murder Ballad, which has transferred there from Manhattan Theatre Club. A faux bar/restaurant has been created, with tables in what used to be the orchestra and seating on what used to be the stage. The story, a love/lust triangle, involves a rather callous young woman who marries a classic Nice Guy but who pines for the Bad Boy boyfriend she left behind. Like Here Lies Love, the show is through-sung, with a score by Juliana Nash and lyrics by Julia Jordan which is wonderful. All the performers are phenomenal, and director Trip Cullman once again has demonstrated why he is one of the finest directors of his generation.

Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812 is being performed in a venue in the meat packing district, where a large tent has been erected, containing a quasi-Russian nightclub, dubbed Kazino. The audience is seated at tables, and a modest Russian meal is served before and during the performance. Also though-sung, it’s based on a section of Tolstoy’s War and Peace which, like Murder Ballad, has a love triangle, this one involving a young woman who’s supposed to marry an impoverished prince; but since he’s away fighting the French she takes up with a Bad Boy, an officer, instead. Composer/lyricist Dave Malloy has essentially musicalized a play, which means yes, it’s all sung, but mostly they are singing the dialogue, which I found wearisome. The singing is OK, but not close to that in Here Lies Love or Murder Ballad, and some of the acting is too broad.

As you can see, I have written about these three shows in order of preference.

Bunty Berman Presents is yet another new musical, produced by the New Group at the Acorn Theatre. It’s about a cheesy Bollywood director/producer whose production company is on the ropes. Bunty, an Indian version of Max Bialystock has made one flop after another. His only hope is a pact with the devil, in the form of a gangster who’s willing to fund Bunty’s studio, but only if he makes his son a star. So, we’ve got elements of The Producers here, as well as Bullets Over Broadway. The problem is, Ayub Khan Din’s book is broad and rather silly, and the songs he’s written with Paul Bogaev seem like generic Broadway show tunes of a bygone era. This could all be said of The Producers, I know, but that show had two great stars and Susan Stroman to direct them. Scott Elliott is a fine director of dramas, but he’s no Susan Stroman. Bunty Berman Presents isn’t terrible, but it just isn’t good enough; and, it caps off a very weak season for the New Group, lowlighted by my personal favorite for Bomb of the Year, Clive.

These Halcyon Days, at the Irish Arts Center, is a poignant two-hander by Deirdre Kinahan set in on the porch of an old folks’ home, sort of The Gin Game without the gin. Sean, a retired actor, sits around in a wheelchair in what seems to be terminal depression, until Patricia barges in. She’s a retired schoolteacher with a liver condition which requires constant care. She misses the life she once had. Sean doesn’t much miss acting, but he does miss his “partner” of many years, who has pretty much dumped him in the home and gone off to start a new relationship. Anita Reeves and Stephen Brennan and superb, under David Horan’s sensitive and non-obtrusive direction. These Halcyon Days is funny and touching, even if you’re not of the demographic of the characters. After all – you will be one day, won’t you?

Finally, CSC has ended its season with an uneven production of Brecht’s The Caucasian Chalk Circle, in a translation by James and Tania Stern with which I was unfamiliar. I only knew the Eric Bentley version, which seems to me superior to this one, and which includes Brecht’s lyrics (there are songs interspersed throughout). Here, lyrics by W.H. Auden have been substituted, set to music by Duncan Sheik, which is unremarkable but at least it’s not Kurt Weill.

The story, in case you don’t know the play, is about a peasant woman named Grusha who saves the infant son of an aristocrat murdered during a revolution. The bad guys want to kill the baby, too, so Grusha treks across the mountains and starts up a new life. For a while, she pretty much drops out of the play as Brecht takes up the story of Azdak, the tow n drunk and reprobate who finds himself appointed judge. The stories converge when the child’s mother, a callow aristocrat who only wants her child back because he has inherited his father’s money, shows up demanding justice, which Azdak dispenses with the circle of chalk.

Brian Kulick has staged the play as if it were being presented by a ragtag group of Russian actors, who enter babbling in Russian but then switch to English. They are all terrific, most playing several roles each. My fave was Elizabeth A. Davis as Grusha. My least fave was Christopher Lloyd, who is way too over the top (and, I think, way too old) as Azdak.

HERE LIES LOVE. Public Theater, 425 Lafayette St.
TICKETS: 212-967-7555
MURDER BALLAD. Union Square Theatre, 100 E. 17th St.
TICKETS: 800-982-2787
NATASHA, PIERRE AND THE GREAT COMET OF 1812. Kazino, 13th St. @
Washington St.
TICKETS: www.kazinonyc.com
BUNTY BERMAN PRESENTS. Acorn Theatre, 410 W. 42nd St.
TICKETS: 212-244-3380
THESE HALCYON DAYS. Irish Arts Center, 553 W. 51st St.
TICKETS: 866-811-4111
THE CAUCASIAN CHALK CIRCLE. Classic Stage Co., 136 E. 13th St.
TICKETS: 212-677-4210

For discount tickets for groups of ten or more, contact Carol Ostrow Productions & Group Sales. Phone: 212-265-8500. E-Mail: ostrow1776@aol.com.

“It requires a certain largeness of spirit to give generous appreciation to large achievements. A society with a crabbed spirit and a cynical urge to discount and devalue will find that one day, when it needs to draw upon the reservoirs of excellence, the reservoirs have run dry.”

— George F. Will

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who actually does strive to do the deeds; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement; and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.”

— Theodore Roosevelt

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“On the Aisle with Larry” 6 May 2014

Lawrence Harbison, our The Playfixer, brings you up to date with what’s hot and what’s not in New York. In this column, Larry reports on PIPPIN. THE BIG KNIFE, I’LL EAT YOU LAST, THE TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL, ORPHANS, SCRAMBLED EGGS and MOOSE MURDERED.

Roger O. Hirson’s book for Pippin (back on Broadway at the Music Box Theatre) always gets short shrift, as do most musical books, so I have decided to start my comments with it. Pippin is supposed to be about the son of Charlemagne; but, really, it’s a contemporary tale of a confused 20-something trying to find something to believe in, and to make his way in the world. When the show first came out, in 1972 (71?), its context was very much the Vietnam War. This time around, I saw in Pippin’s story a parable about young people cast adrift from a world which does not value them, who somehow must navigate the tricky path to adulthood, all too often a slippery slope.

Diane Paulus has reconceived the show as a circus, complete with phenomenal acrobatics. Amazingly, many of the acrobats she has hired are also terrific dancers, and they execute Chet Walker’s Fosse-inspired choreography with wonderful aplomb. Pippin is no longer a goofy hippie – he’s an archetypal contemporary 20-something – and Matthew James Thomas is terrific in the role. Andrea Martin (Berthe) and Charlotte D’Amboise (Fastrada) both stop the show, Martin with her feisty rendition of “No Time at All,” which she finishes hanging upside down on a trapeze, and D’Amboise with “Spread a Little Sunshine,” wherein she demonstrates that she’s still got it as one of the best dancers on Broadway.

Don’t miss Pippin. You’ll have a great time. Expect multiple Tony Awards.

As for The Big Knife, at the American Airlines Theatre, director Doug Hughes does the best he can with Odets’ creaky drama, a poison pen letter to Hollywood, but in the end the play just collapses under the weight of contrivance. Bobby Cannavale seems at sea in the pivotal role of a movie star who tries to take on the insidious studio system and loses. Marin Ireland, as his wife, seems at sea too. Both actors have been much better elsewhere. The best performance comes from Richard Kind as a malevolent studio boss, but it’s not enough to save this turkey of a play.

Bette Midler is giving quite a star turn at the Booth Theatre in John Logan’s I’ll Eat You Last, wherein she plays the late super-agent Sue Mengers. She sits on a sofa the whole time, and manages to hold the audience in the palm of her hand as she regales us with tales of how she became one of the top Hollywood power brokers. Mengers was a ruthless, indefatigable woman, but with a wonderful catty wit which is on full display here.

Midler’s snub from the Tony nominating committee is inexplicable. Puh-lease … Bette wuz robbed.

A different kind of star turn is on display at the Stephen Sondheim Theatre, in the revival of Horton Foote’s The Trip to Bountiful. Cicely Tyson has come out of retirement to play Carrie Watts, the old lady who just wants to go home to the town of her youth. Tyson is heartbreaking as Carrie. Even if Midler had gotten a Tony nomination, Tyson would still be a shoo-in. Director Michael Wilson’s production is haunting, and there is wonderful work here from Cuba Gooding, Jr. as Carrie’s son Ludie, from Vanessa Williams as his catty wife Jessie Mae, and from Condola Rashad as a young woman Carrie meets on the bus on her way home.

Bring plenty of Kleenex.

It’s just been announced that Lyle Kessler’s Orphans, at the Schoenfeld Theatre is closing in a couple of weeks, a victim of the Tony Roulette. Had it opened earlier in the season it might have had a shot at finding an audience, but there is just too much competition this time of year, even with the presence in the cast of Alec Baldwin, who is terrific as Harold, the gangster on the lam who because a strange father figure to two childlike young men. Ben Foster is terrific as Treat, the thuggish older brother, but the performance being given by Tom Sturridge as Philip, is seared in my memory. Sturridge plays Philip as if he were a feral cat, jumping all over John Lee Beatty’s dilapidated set. He’s phemonenal.

Orphans deserved better. It’s a great play, being given a great production by A-list director Daniel Sullivan. See it before it closes.

I also enjoyed Scrambled Eggs, at the Beckett Theatre, a comedy by Robin Amos Kahn and Gary Richards about a menopausal woman who tells us the story of her trials and travails. Amy Van Nostrand is wonderful as Our Heroine, and is ably supported by Anne O’Sullivan, Mary Catherine Wright, Jim Frangione, Candace Brecker and Michael Dean Morgan as a Cast of Thousands.

Scrambled Eggs will have particular resonance for 50-something women; but I’m not of their number and I found it quite amusing.

Finally, I read Arthur Bicknell’s Moose Murdered, his self-published memoir of how the most famous bomb in Broadway history happened. You know the one I mean. It’s a cautionary tale, told quite wittily, about how the best laid plans of mice, men and playwrights oft can go astray. It would have been easy for Bicknell to seek revenge for what happened to him and his play; but this is a man with great good humor and a philosophical outlook on life. He’s probably been kinder to the culprits than they deserved.

Anyway, I recommend his book. You can get in on Amazon.

PIPPIN. Music Box Theatre, 239 W. 45th St.
TICKETS: www.telecharge.com or 212-239-6200

THE BIG KNIFE. American Airlines Theatre, 227 W. 42nd St.
TICKETS: www.roundabouttheatre.org or 212-719-1300
I’LL EAT YOU LAST. Booth Theatre, 222 W. 45th St.
TICKETS: www.telecharge.com or 212-239-6200
THE TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL. Stephen Sondheim Theatre, 124 W. 43rd ST.
TICKETS: www.telecharge.com or 212-239-6200
ORPHANS. Schoenfeld Theatre, 236 W. 45th St.
TICKETS: www.telecharge.com or 212-239-6200
SCRAMBLED EGGS. Beckett Theatre, 410 W. 42nd St.
TICKETS: 800-447-7400
MOOSE MURDERED. Available at www.amazon.com

For discount tickets for groups of ten or more, contact Carol Ostrow Productions & Group Sales. Phone: 212-265-8500. E-Mail: ostrow1776@aol.com.

“It requires a certain largeness of spirit to give generous appreciation to large achievements. A society with a crabbed spirit and a cynical urge to discount and devalue will find that one day, when it needs to draw upon the reservoirs of excellence, the reservoirs have run dry.”

— George F. Will

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who actually does strive to do the deeds; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement; and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.”

— Theodore Roosevelt

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